WHY Can Horses eat Dandelions, Leaves, Green etc? FIND OUT!

Dandelions, a.k.a horse lettuce –  are safe for horses to eat, but should not be a daily diet for horses.

Can my horse eat dandelions?  Of course but maybe they should not be a regular feed!

Horses go nuts at the taste of dandelions, and its vibrant color makes pastures aesthetically pleasing to look at, but it may not be as healthy as you think.

Generally, dandelions are “safe” for healthy horses, but they are super rich in fructans, more so than fresh spring grass.

To a healthy horse, it’s no problem but to horses that are metabolically challenged, or have Cushing’s Equine Metabolic Syndrome and Insulin Resistance, this is a big one.

The current health status of your horse will determine if it will eat dandelion or not or how much it will consume.

What Is Stringhalt in Horses?

Stringhalt in horses is a condition where a horse’s hock spontaneously flexes. This can be mild, or serious enough to make your vet recommend euthanasia.

The best treatment with false dandelion poisoning is to remove horses from areas where the noxious plants grow and set up an appointment with the veterinary as soon as possible. Over the course of a few weeks or months, the horse should recover.

From experience, the major cause of horses experiencing stringhalt is in FALSE dandelion, a.k.a flatweed (when consumed in excess).

Real or actual dandelions lack branches, are hollow, and don’t have stem leaves, lack hairs, and features leaves that look like they have teeth. There are actually various false dandelions out there, and they all can differ in stem leaves, branching, and hair along with some differences in the flower.

So How Do You Know If You Have Real/True Dandelions or Dangerous False Dandelions?

Dandelions

False Dandelions

Dandelions have jagged leavesHypochoeris radicata or hypochaeris (false dandelions) are lobe-kike and hairy
False dandelions have many branching flower stems that can attain heights of 24 inches, and each with a single, yellow flower.
Also known as flatweed, or cat’s ear, false dandelions are perennial plants that can be found in yards or lawns.

It’s best to prevent horses from grazing a plant if you suspect it is a false one.

Can Humans Eat Dandelions?

Dandelions are safe for humans, although they taste better when you cook them.

Is Dandelions Poisonous To Horses?

No, it is not. Horses love fresh dandelion leaves and may sometimes dig up the roots.

Rich in magnesium, calcium, potassium, copper, vitamins A, B, C, and D and iron, Dandelions have more vitamin C and A than most other fruit and veggies.

Are Yellow Flowers Toxic to Horses?

Yellow flowers from dandelions are safe for horses when consumed moderately.

Can Horses Have Dandelion?

Healthy horses can have dandelion with no problem.

ALSO SEE: Can Horses eat Carrots?

What does Dandelion Do for Horses?

Dandelion leaves work as kidney and urinary tonic and detox aide while the root promotes liver cleansing and health.

Are False Dandelions Poisonous?

Carolina False Dandelion and Cat’s Ear are edible when consumed moderately. They taste a bit better than common dandelion too. Lastly, their medical properties are close to True Dandelions, especially in the case of Cart’s ear.

Are Dandelions Good for Pasture?

Dandelions are good for pasture and grazing. Cows love them and they pack nutrients!

Can A Horse Eat Too Many Dandelions?

True dandelions when consumed in excess have no ill effects. However, FALSE dandelions (such as hypochoeris radicata or hypochaeris radicata) are said to trigger stringhalt in horses if too many of these plants are consumed.

Can Horses eat Dandelions

Are Dandelions Healthy for Horses?

Dandelions packs the following nutrients for horses – Vitamin A, B complex, C, D, E and K as well as magnesium, iron, calcium, potassium. Plus, it is a potent liver tonic, detoxifier and has strong diuretic ability.

Can Horses eat Yellow Dandelions?

Yellow dandelions are safe for horses to graze on in a pasture.

Can Horses Eat Dandelions Flowers?

Dandelion flowers add great nutrients to your horse diet needs.

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